Driver Errors in Device Manager

 

This article explains how to address each error that a user may encounter while using Killer devices.

Fall Creator's Update Breaks Network Adapter

 

Some users have experienced issues with their network adapters directly after the Windows 10 Fall Creator's Update. The errors vary, but most point to a hardware failure of some kind. We have received reports of "Network Cable Unplugged" and "Device Cannot Start," even though the adapters were working normally before the update. Unfortunately, in some cases, the only solution seems to be to uninstall and reinstall the Windows 10 Fall Creator's Update. However, one thing you can try is uninstalling all drivers for the device from the Windows driver store, then restarting the machine, and installing the latest drivers. Here are the steps: 

  1. Make sure you have the latest Killer Control Center installer handy on the machine (you may need to use a USB thumb drive or some other medium if you can't access the Internet with the machine). 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. You can hold off on restarting for now if an uninstaller says to do so.
    1. If you encounter any issues with uninstalling, such as the uninstaller hanging (give it at least ten minutes), or giving an error message, cancel the uninstallation, then right-click the taskbar and click Task Manager.
    2. Make sure the Processes tab is selected.
    3. Click Name at the top of the "Name" column to sort by name.
    4. Scroll down and find any "Killer" process under "Apps" and "Background Processes", click it, and click the End Task button.
    5. Click the Services tab. 
    6. Click Name to sort by name.
    7. Scroll down and find the "Killer Network Service". Right-click it and click Stop. 
    8. Close the Task Manager window and return to the Apps and Features menu, and continue uninstalling all "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" entries.
  3. Close Apps and Features and right-click Start and click Device Manager
  4. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  5. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager. The adapter will probably reappear, and may or may not still show a Code 10, but I would suggest continuing with this guide either way.
  8. Repeat steps 4-7 until you no longer have the option to Delete the driver software for this device. Note that you could keep doing this indefinitely, as Windows will always install a default driver, but once you can no longer Delete the driver software for this device, you have accomplished the goal of clearing out all of the drivers that we were trying to clear out, and so you're done by that point.
  9. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. 
  10. Once the machine has restarted, run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If everything doesn't look perfect, restart the machine after the installation, even if the installer did not say to do so. 

If that doesn't solve the issue, you can try uninstalling the Fall Creator's Update. Here are the steps to do that:

  1. Click ​Start
  2. Type ​Windows Update ​and click ​Windows Update Settings.
  3. Click ​Recovery​ on the left. 
  4. Under "Go back to the previous version of Windows 10" click ​the ​Get Started​ button, and follow the prompts from there to revert to the previous version of Windows 10.

Once you have reverted to the previous version of Windows 10, make sure you hae updated to the latest version of your network adapter drivers. You can download the latest Killer Control Center, with the latest drivers, from here - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64

Windows will invariably reinstall the update at some point. You can either wait for it to update on its own, or you can search Windows Update, then click Check for Updates, and it will likely download and install the Fall Creator's Update again, hopefully without the same issue, as you will now have the latest drivers for your network adapter. 

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Missing From Device Manager or Grayed Out

5.0 

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Missing From Device Manager or Grayed Out

Note: This guide can be used in the event of any M.2 device vanishing from the Device Manager. The procedure lists Killer devices specifically, but the phenomenon is widespread among M.2 devices and Windows 10, and these same steps can be used to restore functionality when any M.2 device disappears from Device Manager.

When this occurs, it is an issue of the BIOS or the operating system not enumerating the device properly. In very rare situations, it can be cause by some kind of physical trauma causing the device to become dislodged, or the device failing, but more often than not, the hardware is just fine. It’s just a matter of getting Windows or, sometimes, the BIOS, to see it again. Sometimes the device will be missing altogether, or sometimes it will be grayed out - the difference is only in whether your Device Manager is set to show devices that are no longer present in the machine. Either way, the Device Manager thinks that the device is gone, and that is what needs to be addressed.

  • First off, make sure that you do not have any USB devices disabled. The internal Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapter is actually USB device, so if there are any USB devices disabled in your Device Manager, for any reason, this can cause the Bluetooth device to vanish. If you are unable to enable the USB device, then you should resolve that issue first. This includes USB Hub devices, or any devices under the Universal Serial Bus controllers category in Device Manager that show any errors, for any reason. Once you no longer have any disabled USB devices, the Bluetooth device should show back up. On some platforms, this is the #1 cause of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapters mysteriously vanishing from the Device Manager. Once you have resolved the USB issue, restart your machine, and check to see if the missing device has reappeared in your Device Manager. 

USB Error

  • If you do not have any disabled USB devices, or any with errors, or if you have resolved that issue and the Wi-Fi or Bluetooth adapter has not reappeared in the Device Manager, then you will need to update your chipset drivers, and possibly your machine or mainboard’s BIOS. We have noted that some platforms have chipset drivers that are buggy enough that they absolutely will experience this issue if their chipset drivers are not updated. You will need to obtain these drivers from your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support page. If you cannot tell which drivers are the chipset drivers, it is generally recommended that you simply update all of the offered drivers, except for the Killer Network card drivers, which you should get from us, as they are likely more recent. If there is a BIOS update available, then updating the BIOS is also recommended, especially if the BIOS update notes mention anything that might pertain to this situation. Make certain that you at least update the chipset and USB drivers, if applicable. Some platforms combine the USB drivers into the chipset drivers, so you may not see a separate download. Once you have done these updates, restart the machine, and see if the missing device reappears in the Device Manager. Depending on what is available, the best order in which to update is as follows:
    1. Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard's support page.
    2. Update your chipset drivers from  your machine or mainboard's support page.
    3. Update the USB drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page. If none are listed, they are probably rolled into the chipset driver.
    4. Update all other drivers available from your machine or mainboard's support page, except Killer Networking and Bluetooth drivers, which you should get from us.
    5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  • Windows itself can also play a part in the disappearing device. The Anniversary Update saw many such devices vanish, so much so that the Creator’s Update added a Bluetooth troubleshooter to Windows 10. Make sure that your Windows installation is up to date by using Windows Search to search Windows Update

    windows update

    then press Enter, and click Check for Updates

  • Once it has downloaded and installed everything it finds, restart the machine, and repeat this process until Windows Update finds no updates directly after restarting. Once this happens, check to see if the device has reappeared in the Device Manager. If this doesn’t help, and the issue is Bluetooth related, you can try troubleshooting using Windows built-in troubleshooter. Microsoft has instructions here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14169/windows-10-fix-bluetooth-problems-faq
  • If the device is still missing from the Device Manager, then that means that it isn’t the chipset drivers (or at least it isn’t only the chipset drivers) that is not properly enumerating the device, but rather the BIOS itself. In this case, you will need to discharge the machine to force the BIOS to re-enumerate all of its hardware. Before you do this, make sure that you have updated the BIOS to the latest version, from the mainboard or machine manufacturer’s website, so that you address the flaw that caused this issue in the first place. Once that BIOS update is in place, and you have confirmed that the machine has booted back up, but the device is still not appearing in Device Manager, shut the machine back down, and unplug it from the wall. You will now need to fully discharge the machine.
    • If this is a desktop, you will need to remove the side panel, discharge yourself of static electricity on something metal (your computer’s case might work, or possibly your desk) and look for the CMOS battery. It is a large coin-cell battery. Remove that battery. Sometimes it’s easier with a flathead screwdriver, but it should be fairly simple to remove. Once you have removed that battery, press the power button on the machine 2-3 times to completely discharge it, then replace the CMOS battery and the case. If you are not comfortable doing this on your own, please refer to your mainboard or machine's support. 
    • If this is a laptop, hopefully it is one where you can easily remove the battery. This will be specific to your model of laptop, so you may need to refer to your owner’s manual, or your laptop’s support website. Some MSI models are held in with a single screw. If you are able to remove the laptop battery, do so, and then press the laptop’s power button a few times to fully discharge it. If you are unable to remove the laptop’s battery, temporarily change the power plan to a setting that does not allow it to sleep when the battery is low, then run the laptop until it discharges itself. Once it has discharged itself, press the power button a few times to make sure it is fully discharged.
    • Once you have a fully discharged machine, put it back together, plug it back in, and let it boot in to Windows. You may see a message mentioning setting the BIOS to defaults, or something along those lines. This is nothing to be alarmed about – simply confirm that you want it set to defaults, unless you had set custom settings, in which case, you will need to re-set those custom settings. In the future, this message may be a warning that your CMOS or laptop battery is dead or on its last legs, but for now, we know that you discharged the machine on purpose, so we can safely ignore this warning. Once you are booted back in to Windows, check the Device Manager to make sure that the missing Wi-Fi or Bluetooth device is no longer missing.
  • In some very rare cases, the device may not show up because the machine was not fully discharged. We have had users report that they were able to repeat the steps to discharge their machines a second time, and have had success after that. Once the updates were in place, and the devices shows up, that is usually the end of the problem.

One final step that you can take, if you are willing and able to do so, is to physically reseat your Wi-Fi adapter. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device are on the same card, so there is only one adapter to reseat, and reseating this adapter only requires that you remove one screw, slide it out of the slot, then slide it back in and screw it back down, being careful not to dislodge or damage the attached antenna leads. However, the difficulty in getting to this adapter and performing this step will vary depending on your machine or mainboard, and your level of expertise. You may wish to consult with your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support at this point. If you have followed all of the other steps, and the device still has not reappeared, the device, or the mainboard, may also be physically damaged, and in need of repair, which would also necessitate contacting your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support for RMA or repair options.  

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

 

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

code 10 device cannot start

We have seen many Code 10 errors lately from machines where Windows 10 has automatically updated the drivers from older versions. These errors do not mean that your adapter has actually failed. This is an issue with Windows 10, and getting the proper drivers installed will correct the issue. 

First, try updating to the latest Killer Control Center, which contains the latest suite and drivers. You can find that download here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64​. If you have any problems with the install, you can refer to our KB article on that subject here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software​.

If you have no way of getting drivers onto the machine (no USB thumb drive, no other means of connecting to the Internet with this machine) then click here to jump down to the alternate guide to fixing Code 10 errors.

If you have installed the latest Killer Control Center and restarted the machine, and that did not clear the Code 10 error, you can usually clear it by cleaning out the driver store. Here are the steps to clear out the driver store, and install the latest driver:

  1. Make sure you have the latest Killer Control Center installer handy on the machine (you may need to use a USB thumb drive or some other medium if you can't access the Internet with the machine). 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. You can hold off on restarting for now if an uninstaller says to do so.
  3. Close Apps and Features and right-click Start and click Device Manager
  4. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  5. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager. The adapter will probably reappear, and may or may not still show a Code 10, but I would suggest continuing with this guide either way.
  8. Repeat steps 4-7 until you no longer have the option to Delete the driver software for this device. Note that you could keep doing this indefinitely, as Windows will always install a default driver, but once you can no longer Delete the driver software for this device, you have accomplished the goal of clearing out all of the drivers that we were trying to clear out, and so you're done by that point.
  9. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. 
  10. Once the machine has restarted, run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If everything doesn't look perfect, restart the machine after the installation, even if the installer did not say to do so. 

 

 

The Alternate Guide to Fixing Code 10 Errors

This guide is only intended for use when you cannot get drivers onto the machine using a USB drive or an alternate means of Internet access, such as an installed Wi-Fi adapter.

  1. Close all other applications, as you will need to allow restarts as they are requested. If you regain connectivity after a restart, click here to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. If an installer requests a restart at any point, click to allow it to restart. 
  3. Once the machine has restarted, test to see if the issue is resolved. 
  4. If not, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  8. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. Once the machine has restarted, check to see if the issue is resolved. 
  9. If not, repeat steps 4 - 8 until you regain Internet connectivity. Once you do, remember to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 

If you have any further issues or questions, feel free to reach out to support at http://www.killernetworking.com/about/contact

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

You may wish to create an Ad-Hoc or Hotspot network with your Killer Adapter on your Windows 10 machine.

With Windows 10, all Ad-Hoc and Hotspot functionality has been officially moved away from the drivers, and into the operating system itself.

If you would like to create a Hotspot or Ad-Hoc network with Windows 10, you simply need to click Start, type Hotspot, and press Enter. All of the relevant settings for your Hotspot network will be on that page.

Hotspot Settings
With Windows 10, this is the current official limit of Hotspot or Ad-Hoc functionality.

The Windows 10 version of our driver does not support the "Hosted Network" feature because Microsoft's own WDI driver does not have support for this. Microsoft is having all wireless vendors move to the WDI model, thus this feature will not work on Windows 10 drivers until after (and if) Microsoft expands support for SoftAP/Wi-Fi Direct.

In the meantime, if you need this feature back for certain older applications that made use of their own Hotspot or Ad-Hoc features, you can load the Windows 8.1 drivers via Device Manager from our INF download. We have verified that this works, and have had confirmation from other users as well.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

However, we cannot guarantee that Windows Update will not automatically update these drivers, or that they will work flawlessly with Windows 10, as they are, after all, Windows 8.1 drivers. Use Windows 8.1 drivers in Windows 10 at your own risk.

Windows Server Drivers

 

Windows Server Drivers

From time to time, we receive requests for Windows Server compatible drivers for our network adapters. Although we do not provide package installers for Windows Server editions, our drivers are Windows WHQL certified, and as such will work with recent Windows Server editions, so long as they are installed manually from the Device Manager using our .INF files.

You can download the .INF files from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

If you need assistance manually installing the .INF files using Device Manager, you can follow our guide here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/10-installing-drivers-device-manager

The Killer Control Center is not availalbe on Windows Server editions. 

Installing Bluetooth Drivers From Device Manager

 

In some cases, when there is no driver for your Bluetooth device, the Device Manager may mis-identify the Bluetooth device, or it may not identify it at all. In this case, you will need to install the Bluetooth driver from the Device Manager by following these steps:

  1. Run the installer but don't bother rebooting
  2. Verify that it created a folder called "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bluetooth Suite"
  3. In Device Manager, double-click the Bluetooth device, however it is currently named
  4. Under the Driver tab, click Update Driver
  5. Click Browse My Computer For Driver Software
  6. Click Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer
  7. Click Have Disk
  8. Browse to "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bluetooth Suite\driver"
  9. There should be only one option - atheros_bth.inf - click it and click Open
  10. Click Okay
  11. Select Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4 Bluetooth 4.1 and click Next
  12. Click Yes on the warning popup
  13. Reboot after it finishes the install
  14. After the reboot, check Device Manager to verify that your Bluetooth device is now named Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4 Bluetooth 4.1 and you should be good to go!

Ethernet Adapter No Longer In Device Manager

 

When a device goes missing from the Device Manager, it means that either the BIOS or the operating system is not enumerating the device for some reason. Check for another device in Device Manager that may be the Ethernet controller, but not labeled as such. It may be called "Unknown Device" or "Network Controller." If such a device exists, you can usually simply right-click on that device and click Update Driver and the problem will resolve itself from there.

If there is nothing at all indicating the existence of the Ethernet device, then the device may have been disbled in the BIOS. If you have recently made changes in the BIOS, then this would be worth checking. It's usually a fairly obvious setting, such as "Enable onboard LAN" that has been unchecked. If you have not changed anything in the BIOS, check to with your machine or mainboard manufacturer to make sure that you are using the most up to date version of the BIOS available. 

If you have ruled out the above, you may be able to uninstall and reinstall the drivers for the device by following these steps:

  1. Download the latest Killer Control Center installer from here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you do not have another adapter on that machine, you may need to use a USB drive, or some other method of moving the file onto the machine.
  2. Right-click Start and click Apps and Features
  3. Find any "Killer" entry and uninstall it, including "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Performance Suite" or any variation.
  4. Restart the machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  5. Once the machine has booted back up, right-click start and click Device Manager
  6. Click View and click Show hidden devices
  7. Hopefully the missing adapter will show up, albeit grayed out. Right click on it, and click Uninstall Device.
  8. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device , if it exists, then click Uninstall.
  9. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager.
  10. If the adapter reppears, close the Device Manager and run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If it does not, restart the computer.

If the adapter still does not appear, then try updating all of the drivers available from your mainboard or machine manufacturer. The chipset driver is especially important. Uninstalling the most recent Windows Updates may also help, especially if the issue was first noticed after a Windows Update. Sometimes, uninstalling and reinstalling the Windows Update in question will result in a more successful outcome, with a working Ethernet adapter. 

Clean Install Any Driver

 

How To Clean Install Any Driver

Note: This guide is written for Windows 10, but will also work for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 with only minor variation. 

Before you begin this process, you need to know where the driver installer stores its temporary files. Recent Killer installers store all of their temporary files in the TEMP folder, which can be accessed by pressing Win Key + R to bring up the Run command, then type %TEMP% and press Enter. Other driver packages may use other locations, but you will need to know this information to clear these files, or Windows may attempt to install old drivers from this location. 

  1. Make sure you have the latest driver installer for the driver you will be installing. Killer Drivers can be found here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads. The Killer Control Center includes the latest performance suite, as well as the latest drivers for current Ethernet and Wi-Fi adapters. Bluetooth drivers are separate. 
  2. Right-click Start and click Apps and Features and uninstall any applications associated with the drivers that you will be reinstalling. For Killer Drivers, this would include any Killer applications, such as the Killer Control Center and Killer Network Manager, as well as "Killer Drivers" or any variations of these applications. If the old version of the suite will not uninstall, please see this KB article - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software
  3. Restart your machine using Start > Power > Restart. Do not use your machine's power button. This button is often mapped to the "sleep" function, and does not serve the same purpose. Restarting your machine clears any running processes that may be tied to files in the temporary folders.
  4. Delete all temporary installation files for the device driver. For Killer Drivers, you can accomplish this by deleting the entire contents of the TEMP folder. Some elements may not be removable, but they are not likely to be related to the Killer application or drivers. 
  5. Right-click Start and click Device Manager.
  6. Find the device whose driver you are uninstalling or reinstalling. 
  7. Right-click the device and click Uninstall.
  8. Check the box for Remove the driver software for this device, if the option exists.
  9. Click the Uninstall button.
  10. Once the Device Manager has completed uninstalling the driver, click the light-blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager. The device will probably reappear.
  11. Repeat steps 6 thru 10 until you no longer see the option to Remove the driver software for this device. At this point, you have removed all installed drivers from the driver store. If Windows has a default driver, it will still reinstall that driver, but you can generally leave that driver in place as it ships with Windows.
  12. Restart your machine once more.
  13. Run the installer for the latest drivers. 

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