Slow Network Speeds

 

Slow Network Speeds

If you are experiencing slow Internet or network speeds, you can follow this troubleshooting guide to address and correct the most common problems. 

If you haven't already, please try installing the latest Killer Control Center from our website, and only from our website. It includes many fixes and improvements that are not be included in other packages. If you are still using the Killer Network Manager, you'll want to download the Killer Control Center, and then manually uninstall the Killer Network Manager, as well as the "Killer Drivers" entry in your programs list. You can find the latest Killer Control Center here: http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. Please download and run this installer, which will also install the latest drivers. If you experience any problems installing the Killer Control Center, you can refer to this article for help - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software 

Once you have successfully updated your drivers, you will want to restart your computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. It is important to note that closing the lid or pressing the power button on many modern computers does not shut them down, but instead activates sleep mode. You must restart them by clicking Start > Power > Restart for them to restart.

If updating the drivers does not solve the issue, try resetting your networking equipment in this specific order, even if you have reset your some or all of your equipment previously. This order is proven to help your devices sync up properly, and will help to get a clean slate with further troubleshooting. Doing this can help even if only one device is experiencing problems. 

  1. Shut down your computer.
  2. Locate your modem and note the lights on your modem when it is normal and ready. There may be a "Ready" light.
  3. Unplug your modem, router, and any switches or hubs, between your computer and the modem, as well as any wireless boosters or access points, and leave them all unplugged for now.
  4. Plug in your modem.
  5. Wait until your modem's lights show normal operation again.
  6. Plug in your router, if you have one, and give it about five minutes to boot.
  7. Plug in anything else between your computer and the modem
  8. Power on your computer.
  9. Once your computer is booted and connected to the Internet, you will want to reset its network stack:
    1. In the search box on the taskbar, type Command prompt, right-click Command prompt, and then select Run as administrator > Yes.
    2. At the command prompt, run the following commands in the listed order, and then check to see if that fixes your connection problem:
      • Type netsh winsock reset and press Enter.
      • Type netsh int ip reset and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /release and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /renew and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /flushdns and press Enter.
  10. Now reboot your machine once more and test to see if the issue is resolved.

If not, the next step is to make sure that your Windows installation is completely up to date. Microsoft has been updating Windows more often than with any previous release, so it's important to keep things up to date. To do this, simply search Windows Updates, hit Enter, and then click Check for Updates. If your machine finds updates, check again once it finishes installing. Once your machine finds no updates, restart again, and then check for updates once more. Once your machine finds no updates upon a fresh reboot, your Windows installation should be fully up to date.

If you have performed the above, and you are still experiencing issues with slow network speeds, there are some other things to try:

  • Set a benchmark. Place the device in one place, if dealing with Wi-Fi, and run a test using one speed test. Turn off all other network usage while troubleshooting. Speedtest.net and Testmy.net are both good bandwidth tests. Run three tests in short succession and record an average as your starting point. Test after each change to see if there has been improvement. Record what you changed, and what the speeds the change produced. If the change seems dramatic, restart the machine and test again to be sure. 
  • Make sure your BIOS is up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Make sure your chipset drivers are up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Make sure all of the other drivers are up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page. You can safely download and install all available driver packages. If the driver does not apply, it will either not install, or will not be used. If the only options in a driver installer package are "Repair" or "Uninstall", choosing "Repair" will update the driver, if there is a newer driver available.
  • Update the firmware on your router if you own the router.
  • Update the firmware on your modem if you own the modem, but only if your ISP accepts the firmware. Your ISP's support team can help you with this. Some ISPs also have this information listed somewhere, but they may need to do something on their end if you update the firmware, in order to re-authorize your modem. 
  • Have your ISP update the firmware on your modem or router if they own your modem or router.
  • If you are using Wi-Fi, minimize the number of solid objects between the access point's antenna and the device suffering from low speeds, using line-of-sight. Moving a device or antenna even an inch to one side could bypass multiple solid objects, making an enormous difference. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi, use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi analyzer to make changes to your router's settings. 
    • 5 GHz routers should be set to channels 36-48, and/or 149-165 that are as far away from other channels as possible.
    • 2.4 GHz routers should be set to channels 1, 6, or 11, depending on which channels have the least powerful conflicting radios present.
    • Sideband, or side channel should be set to 20 MHz if there are many other Wi-Fi access points in your area, especially if you are forced to share a channel. Higher side channels are less powerful, but provide a wider band, allowing the signal to get around solid objects better, theoretically improving performance in situations where there are no interference concerns, but the Wi-Fi signal needs to "get around" solid objects. Many, however, report that, in real life testing, 20 MHz still provides the better signal, so your mileage may vary. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi and your router has both a 5 GHz radio and a 2.4 GHz radio, name them something different. Although it might seem simpler to name them the same thing, many routers do not handle this very well, and you can see performance issues by having them named the same thing. Many people opt to simply add "5" to the end of the 5 GHz radio. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi extenders, name each of your extenders something different, so that you know which access point you are connected to. Wi-Fi extenders have limited radio capacity, and will, always provide at least slightly slower speeds than connecting directly to the router, as they have to use the same radio to receive and transmit, at the same time. 
  • If it seems like other machines using the same access point are having no issues, try to verify this. Borrow their machine and run a speed test. Ask for permission first, of course. If you are experiencing issues on a public access point, you might just find that the public access point is just terrible, and that no one else is having a problem because you're the only one playing latency-intensive first person shooters. 
  • If you are using a Wireless-N router in a crowded Wi-Fi environment, you are very likely to encounter drops and speed issues no matter what settings you change. Unfortunately, the 2.4 GHz spectrum is very limited on how many channels are available, and conflicts arise quickly. Updating to a Wireless-AC router may be required to increase your speeds and reduce wireless drops. 
  • If you are using an antivirus or firewall application, try completely uninstalling it for testing purposes. Unfortunately, simply disabling these programs do not work for troubleshooting purposes, as they often continue to manipulate network traffic. They must be fully uninstalled. If you notice that your speeds increase dramatically with the antivirus or firewall application uninstalled, try installing a freshly downloaded version from their website. If that doesn't help, then the issue may be one with the antivirus application itself. In that case, you will want to contact the support team for the antivirus application. 

If you are unable to get your speed issues sorted out using the above tips, feel free to contact us directly using the information below! 

 

How to Update or Install The Killer Control Center

1.0 

Updating or Installing The Killer Control Center

You can find the latest Killer Control Center, as well as the latest drivers for your Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500, here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64.

The installer will automatically detect and install on any 64-bit version of Windows 7, 8.1, and Windows 10.

If you are using an older version of our suite, such as the Killer Network Manager, or you have not updated your network adapter drivers since your last Windows feature update (for example: Anniversary Update, Creator’s Update), then we suggest downloading the Killer Control Center, but uninstalling any application with the "Killer" name from your Apps and Features menu (accessible by right-clicking Start) and restarting your machine before installing the Killer Control Center.

 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

You may wish to create an Ad-Hoc or Hotspot network with your Killer Adapter on your Windows 10 machine.

With Windows 10, all Ad-Hoc and Hotspot functionality has been officially moved away from the drivers, and into the operating system itself.

If you would like to create a Hotspot or Ad-Hoc network with Windows 10, you simply need to click Start, type Hotspot, and press Enter. All of the relevant settings for your Hotspot network will be on that page.

Hotspot Settings
With Windows 10, this is the current official limit of Hotspot or Ad-Hoc functionality.

The Windows 10 version of our driver does not support the "Hosted Network" feature because Microsoft's own WDI driver does not have support for this. Microsoft is having all wireless vendors move to the WDI model, thus this feature will not work on Windows 10 drivers until after (and if) Microsoft expands support for SoftAP/Wi-Fi Direct.

In the meantime, if you need this feature back for certain older applications that made use of their own Hotspot or Ad-Hoc features, you can load the Windows 8.1 drivers via Device Manager from our INF download. We have verified that this works, and have had confirmation from other users as well.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

However, we cannot guarantee that Windows Update will not automatically update these drivers, or that they will work flawlessly with Windows 10, as they are, after all, Windows 8.1 drivers. Use Windows 8.1 drivers in Windows 10 at your own risk.

Windows Server Drivers

 

Windows Server Drivers

From time to time, we receive requests for Windows Server compatible drivers for our network adapters. Although we do not provide package installers for Windows Server editions, our drivers are Windows WHQL certified, and as such will work with recent Windows Server editions, so long as they are installed manually from the Device Manager using our .INF files.

You can download the .INF files from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

If you need assistance manually installing the .INF files using Device Manager, you can follow our guide here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/10-installing-drivers-device-manager

The Killer Control Center is not availalbe on Windows Server editions. 

No Killer Enabled Devices On Linksys WRT32X

 

Users with Killer Network Adapters and the Linksys WRT32X may see "No Killer Enabled Devices" or "0 Killer Enabled Devices" on the user interface page of their WRT32X. 

The Killer optimization on the WRT32X is compatible with all Killer adapters that work with the Killer Control Center, which includes the:E2500, E2400, E2200, E2201, and all of our Wireless-N and Wireless-AC adapters. 

You must also have a recent version of the Killer Control Center installed. You can find the latest version of the Killer Control Center here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you run into any problems updating your performance suite, you can refer to our installation troubleshooting KB here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software.

After you have installed the latest Killer Control Center, if the router still fails to detect the Killer adapters, you may need to unplug the router for ten seconds, then plug it back in. If it still does not recognize the adapters. you may need to restart your computer once more by clicking Start > Power > Restart

If you still experience issues, it is recommended that you contact Linksys Support unless you are having other issues with your Killer adapter, in which case you should reach out to us through the contact form below. 

 

Bluetooth with Killer Wireless-N or Wireless-AC is Not Working

 

The Bluetooth with My Killer Wireless-N or Wireless-AC is Not Working

Note: If your Bluetooth device is missing from Device Manager entirely, please see this KB article: http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/31-bluetooth-missing-from-device-manager

Ensure that you have downloaded the proper version of Killer Bluetooth software for your Killer Wireless card.

  • Please note that the Killer Wireless-N 1202 has a single Bluetooth installer for Windows 7, 8.1, and 10.
  • For Killer Wireless-AC products, please ensure you have downloaded the appropriate version for your adapter and OS, as the Bluetooth software is not unified.

All Bluetooth driver downloads are available here:

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/bluetooth

 

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.