Drivers & Installation

Killer Network Adapters and KRACK Exploit

 

We are aware of the current concern involving the KRACK vulnerabilities in WPA2-PSK Wi-Fi encryption.

All of our current line of network adapters are fully supported only on the current versions of Windows operating systems (Windows 10, 8.1, and 7). As this is a GTK Key exploit, our users are largely safe, as Microsoft has already patched these operating systems to address the issue (https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2017-13080), and the operating system is the primary key handling layer.

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

 

code 10 device cannot start

We have been receiving reports from some users that they are seeing this error on their Killer Networking device in their Device Manager. This usually occurs after they have used the Device Manager to update their drivers, or after Windows Update has updated their drivers. There seems to be a problem with the driver that Microsoft is using when updating machines through their service.

If you encounter this error, it can generally be resolved by updating to the latest Killer Control Center suite from our site, which you can find here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64.

Once you have updated, restart your machine, and the error should be cleared. Please feel free to contact support if you continue to see this error after updating your drivers.

 

Error 2753. The File 'xtendsoftapservice.exe' is Not Marked for Installation

 

Some users may encounter this error when updating their drivers or Killer Control Center, or when uninstalling the Killer Control Center.

Even if you are in the process of updating the Killer Control Center, the issue is that the installer is unable to find this file in order to uninstall it, which is a necssary step for installing the latest suite.

The problem is that the file is either not present, or is not correctly flagged in the registry. This is a bug that was introduced in a few versions of the suite when it was present on your machine during a major Windows feature update, or an upgrade to Windows 10 from another version.

This issue can be resolved by following these steps:

  1. Download the latest Killer Control Center and keep it somewhere handy, to install when you're finished uninstalling the old suite - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
  2. Download Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/17588/fix-problems-that-block-programs-from-being-installed-or-removed 

    microsoft uninstall fixit2
















  3. Once you have both of those things downloaded, uninstall all Killer products from your Apps and Features menu, which you can access by right-clicking Start.

    right click start uninstall killer

  4. You may encounter that same error - Error 2753. The File 'xtendsoftapservice.exe' is Not Marked for Installation - and that is fine. When you do, skip that application, and uninstall any other applications from "Killer" including "Killer Drivers."

  5. Now run the tool from Microsoft. 

  6. For the first menu, you will simply click Next

    ms uninstall fixit 1

















  7. Then after a moment of "Detecting Problems", it will ask if you are having a problem installing or uninstalling a program. Even if you are trying to update or install the Killer Control Center, the actual problem is happening when the installer attempts to uninstall the old suite, so you will choose Uninstalling

    ms uninstall fixit 2

















  8. At the next prompt, the program will ask you to choose from a list of programs. Find the Killer-related program in the list. It may not be the same as the one in this screenshot, but choose whichever Killer suite the program finds, and then click the Next button. 

    ms uninstall fixit 3

















  9. The tool will then proceed to erase the parts of the Killer suite that the installer was unable to remove from the registry. If the program is not listed, you have the option of choosing "Not Listed", and the tool may still find the pieces in the registry that need to be removed. However, it is hard to duplicate that particular scenario, so providing a screenshot is not possible, but it is fairly self-explanatory. 
  10. Once the tool has finished doing its work, you will want to restart your machine once more, and then install the latest Killer Control Center, which you downloaded previously.
  11. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact support at the link below! 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

 

You may wish to create an Ad-Hoc or Hotspot network with your Killer Adapter on your Windows 10 machine.

With Windows 10, all Ad-Hoc and Hotspot functionality has been officially moved away from the drivers, and into the operating system itself.

If you would like to create a Hotspot or Ad-Hoc network with Windows 10, you simply need to click Start, type Hotspot, and press Enter. All of the relevant settings for your Hotspot network will be on that page.

Hotspot Settings
With Windows 10, this is the current official limit of Hotspot or Ad-Hoc functionality.

The Windows 10 version of our driver does not support the "Hosted Network" feature because Microsoft's own WDI driver does not have support for this. Microsoft is having all wireless vendors move to the WDI model, thus this feature will not work on Windows 10 drivers until after (and if) Microsoft expands support for SoftAP/Wi-Fi Direct.

In the meantime, if you need this feature back for certain older applications that made use of their own Hotspot or Ad-Hoc features, you can load the Windows 8.1 drivers via Device Manager from our INF download. We have verified that this works, and have had confirmation from other users as well.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

However, we cannot guarantee that Windows Update will not automatically update these drivers, or that they will work flawlessly with Windows 10, as they are, after all, Windows 8.1 drivers. Use Windows 8.1 drivers in Windows 10 at your own risk.

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Device Missing From Device Manager or Grayed Out

 

When this occurs, it is an issue of the BIOS or the operating system not enumerating the device properly. In very rare situations, it can be cause by some kind of physical trauma causing the device to become dislodged, or the device failing, but more often than not, the hardware is just fine. It’s just a matter of getting Windows or, sometimes, the BIOS, to see it again. Sometimes the device will be missing altogether, or sometimes it will be grayed out - the difference is only in whether your Device Manager is set to show devices that are no longer present in the machine. Either way, the Device Manager thinks that the device is gone, and that is what needs to be addressed.

  • First off, make sure that you do not have any USB devices disabled. The internal Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapter is actually USB device, so if there are any USB devices disabled in your Device Manager, for any reason, this can cause the Bluetooth device to vanish. If you are unable to enable the USB device, then you should resolve that issue first. This includes USB Hub devices, or any devices under the Universal Serial Bus controllers category in Device Manager that show any errors, for any reason. Once you no longer have any disabled USB devices, the Bluetooth device should show back up. On some platforms, this is the #1 cause of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapters mysteriously vanishing from the Device Manager. Once you have resolved the USB issue, restart your machine, and check to see if the missing device has reappeared in your Device Manager. USB Error






















  • If you do not have any disabled USB devices, or any with errors, or if you have resolved that issue and the Wi-Fi or Bluetooth adapter has not reappeared in the Device Manager, then you will need to update your chipset drivers, and possibly your machine or mainboard’s BIOS. We have noted that some platforms have chipset drivers that are buggy enough that they absolutely will experience this issue if their chipset drivers are not updated. You will need to obtain these drivers from your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support page. If you cannot tell which drivers are the chipset drivers, it is generally recommended that you simply update all of the offered drivers, except for the Killer Network card drivers, which you should get from us, as they are likely more recent. If there is a BIOS update available, then updating the BIOS is also recommended, especially if the BIOS update notes mention anything that might pertain to this situation. Make certain that you at least update the chipset and USB drivers, if applicable. Some platforms combine the USB drivers into the chipset drivers, so you may not see a separate download. Once you have done these updates, restart the machine, and see if the missing device reappears in the Device Manager.
  • Windows itself can also play a part in the disappearing device. The Anniversary Update saw many such devices vanish, so much so that the Creator’s Update added a Bluetooth troubleshooter to Windows 10. Make sure that your Windows installation is up to date by using Windows Search to search Windows Update
    windows update


























    then press Enter, and click Check for Updates

  • Once it has downloaded and installed everything it finds, restart the machine, and repeat this process until Windows Update finds no updates directly after restarting. Once this happens, check to see if the device has reappeared in the Device Manager. If this doesn’t help, and the issue is Bluetooth related, you can try troubleshooting using Windows built-in troubleshooter. Microsoft has instructions here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14169/windows-10-fix-bluetooth-problems-faq
  • If the device is still missing from the Device Manager, then that means that it isn’t the chipset drivers (or at least it isn’t only the chipset drivers) that is not properly enumerating the device, but rather the BIOS itself. In this case, you will need to discharge the machine to force the BIOS to re-enumerate all of its hardware. Before you do this, make sure that you have updated the BIOS to the latest version, from the mainboard or machine manufacturer’s website, so that you address the flaw that caused this issue in the first place. Once that BIOS update is in place, and you have confirmed that the machine has booted back up, but the device is still not appearing in Device Manager, shut the machine back down, and unplug it from the wall. You will now need to fully discharge the machine.
    • If this is a desktop, you will need to remove the side panel, discharge yourself of static electricity on something metal (your computer’s case might work, or possibly your desk) and look for the CMOS battery. It is a large coin-cell battery. Remove that battery. Sometimes it’s easier with a flathead screwdriver, but it should be fairly simple to remove. Once you have removed that battery, press the power button on the machine 2-3 times to completely discharge it, then replace the CMOS battery and the case. If you are not comfortable doing this on your own, please refer to your mainboard or machine's support. 
    • If this is a laptop, hopefully it is one where you can easily remove the battery. This will be specific to your model of laptop, so you may need to refer to your owner’s manual, or your laptop’s support website. Some MSI models are held in with a single screw. If you are able to remove the laptop battery, do so, and then press the laptop’s power button a few times to fully discharge it. If you are unable to remove the laptop’s battery, temporarily change the power plan to a setting that does not allow it to sleep when the battery is low, then run the laptop until it discharges itself. Once it has discharged itself, press the power button a few times to make sure it is fully discharged.
    • Once you have a fully discharged machine, put it back together, plug it back in, and let it boot in to Windows. You may see a message mentioning setting the BIOS to defaults, or something along those lines. This is nothing to be alarmed about – simply confirm that you want it set to defaults, unless you had set custom settings, in which case, you will need to re-set those custom settings. In the future, this message may be a warning that your CMOS or laptop battery is dead or on its last legs, but for now, we know that you discharged the machine on purpose, so we can safely ignore this warning. Once you are booted back in to Windows, check the Device Manager to make sure that the missing Wi-Fi or Bluetooth device is no longer missing.
  • In some very rare cases, the device may not show up because the machine was not fully discharged. We have had users report that they were able to repeat the steps to discharge their machines a second time, and have had success after that. Once the updates were in place, and the devices shows up, that is usually the end of the problem.

One final step that you can take, if you are willing and able to do so, is to physically reseat your Wi-Fi adapter. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device are on the same card, so there is only one adapter to reseat, and reseating this adapter only requires that you remove one screw, slide it out of the slot, then slide it back in and screw it back down, being careful not to dislodge or damage the attached antenna leads. However, the difficulty in getting to this adapter and performing this step will vary depending on your machine or mainboard, and your level of expertise. You may wish to consult with your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support at this point. If you have followed all of the other steps, and the device still has not reappeared, the device, or the mainboard, may also be physically damaged, and in need of repair, which would also necessitate contacting your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support for RMA or repair options.  

Installing Drivers from .INF Package Through Device Manager

 

- Install drivers using Device Manager

If you would like to install the Killer E2200, Killer E2400, Killer Wireless-N, or Killer Wireless-AC drivers without the Killer software manually - you can do so using these steps.

First, download the driver only package from: http://www.killernetworking.com/support/Killer-Ethernet-Wireless_INF.zip

After the download is complete, extract the drivers to a temporary location, such as your desktop.

Press Windows key + X
Click Device Manager

Once device manager is open, select the Ethernet Controller, Network Controller, or Unknown device, right click it and click Update Driver Software

This will launch the update driver software wizard

Choose: Browse my computer for driver software

Click Browse... and browse to the location where you extracted the standalone driver package earlier, then click Next

Note: It is recommended that you browse all the way to the right device and right OS. For instance, you can see in the image that we have browsed to C:\drivers\Production\Windows10-x64\ke2200w10 for the Killer E2200 network adapter.

The final screen should show that you have successfully installed the driver. You can now click on Close.

 

The Bluetooth with My Killer Wireless-N or Wireless-AC is Not Working

 

Note: If your Bluetooth device is missing from Device Manager entirely, please see this KB article: http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/31-bluetooth-missing-from-device-manager

Ensure that you have downloaded the proper version of Killer Bluetooth software for your Killer Wireless card.

  • Please note that the Killer Wireless-N 1202 has a single Bluetooth installer for Windows 7, 8.1, and 10.
  • For Killer Wireless-AC products, please ensure you have downloaded the appropriate version for your adapter and OS, as the Bluetooth software is not unified.

All Bluetooth driver downloads are available here:

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/bluetooth

 

Updating or Installing Killer Drivers & Software (Ethernet and Wi-Fi)

 

If you are experiencing a problem with your network driver, or you suspect that your network driver or performance suite may be causing a problem or not performing correctly, you can either update your performance suite by downloading the latest package from your machine or mainboard’s manufacturer, which may include optimizations that are specific to your platform, or you can download the latest Killer Control Center (which replaces the Killer Network Manager) directly from us, at this location.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64

This download, which is the latest performance suite, as well as the latest driver package, applies to the following prodcuts: Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 on Windows 10, 7, and 8.1. 

The Killer Control Center should be able to automatically detect previous installations and update them on its own. If it cannot, or if you are using an older version of our suite, such as the Killer Network Manager, or you have not updated your network adapter drivers since your last Windows feature update (for example: Anniversary Update, Creator’s Update), then we suggest downloading the Killer Control Center, but uninstalling anything with the "Killer" name from your Apps and Features menu and restarting your machine before installing the latest Killer Control Center. 

Please note that the Killer Control Center that is available on our site, while including the latest optimizations for the most recent Windows updates and compatibility fixes for other applications, may not include integrations with your machine or mainboard manufacter’s other gaming applications, should they exist.

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.